PGM Blog


Pets in your Will

For many people, particularly the elderly, it makes sense to consider what may happen to a beloved pet in the event of their death, however, it is still estimated that thousands of pet owners in the UK die each year without making arrangements for their pets in their Wills. By making provision for your pets in your Will you will have the opportunity to ensure that your wishes are carried out in […]

Print Friendly

No-fault divorce

A recent court decision highlighted in the media has served as a timely reminder that we do not have a ‘no fault’ divorce system in England and Wales. The decision has reignited calls to introduce a without blame divorce system. It is considered that a new procedure, where one or both spouses can give notice that the marriage has broken down irretrievably would align much […]

Print Friendly

First-time buyers and the bank of Mum and Dad

Recent reports have shown that first-time buyers now require an average of £33,000 for a deposit on a house. Understandably, young people are finding it extremely difficult to save this amount of money – so, what can they do? The Government scheme Help 2 Buy is one sensible option, but a record number of first-time buyers are now relying on the ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ in […]

Print Friendly

General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR)

It is now increasingly common for the news to contain stories of significant data losses. These are both embarrassing for the organisation concerned and potentially extremely expensive to sort out. There are, of course, many ways in which data losses can occur. They can range from the result of aggressive hacking but can also, and more commonly perhaps, be due to carelessness or a simple […]

Print Friendly

The social media policy – a business must have?

Are you an employer who has had to deal with an employees’ inappropriate use of IT systems or social media? A social media policy is a code of conduct which acts as a guideline for any interactions a company’s employees have on the internet, both as part of their job description, or in their private life. As the use of the internet and social media […]

Print Friendly

The Consequences of Marriage and Divorce on Wills

Is it true that getting married invalidates an existing Will? When you make a Will there are a number of life events that can impact its validity. One of these is marriage. Under UK law, marriage automatically cancels out a Will made before the date of the marriage, rendering it invalid. If you do not make a new Will, the court will follow the rules […]

Print Friendly

The risks involved in making a DIY Will

It is important to make a Will, no matter how old you are, but an increasing number of people are deciding to opt for DIY Wills. At the outset, DIY Wills can be seen as an inexpensive option.  However, the legal costs involved to remedy their potential errors, may well exceed the cost of a professionally prepared Will.  Moreover, it may not be possible to […]

Print Friendly

josh-rose-158801

The impact of social media on your divorce

During a divorce, emotions run high. It’s an upsetting and stressful time. Social media can provide relief from the reality of your situation, but it’s important not to get carried away with online activity and to ensure that status updates and images posted online are not contradictory to anything which you seek to rely on in court or negotiations. You may want to tell the […]

Print Friendly

Is romance dead? (ask Beyonce!)

PGM Director and Solicitor, Paula Murphy provides an insight into the hot topic of post-nuptial agreements! …So, is romance dead? Well, if you are aged over 60, the answer is probably, no. Marriage rates among the over 65’s increased by almost a half between 2009 and 2014. This was at the same time as the marriage rate among the general population fell. I haven’t researched the […]

Print Friendly

probate fees

Will the rise in Probate fees affect you?

The UK government has officially confirmed that probate fees in England and Wales will change in May 2017 to a banded system, where fees increase with the value of the estate, replacing the current flat fees. No fee will be payable for estates worth less than £50,000, but the charges will increase rapidly beyond that, rising to a maximum of £20,000 for estates above £2 […]

Print Friendly